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Pulsed magnetic fields in Toulouse

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P. Kapitsa

The generation and use of pulsed magnetic fields was pioneered in Cambridge in 1924 by P. Kapitsa (right picture). The Service National des Champs Magnétiques Pulsés was created in the Institut National des Sciences Appliquées of Toulouse at the beginning of the 60’s, under the guidance of S. Askénazy, to generate non-destructive pulses of magnetic fields.

In 1965, 40 T was obtained using a 100 kJ capacitor bank. Later, the bank was upgraded to 1.25 MJ, which permitted in 1987 to generate pulsed magnetic fields up to 61 T, of total duration of 0.2 s, using a coil wound with NbTi-reinforced Cu-wires. At the same time, 1 s duration pulses were also possible up to 46 T using copper coils.

In the early 90’s, le Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Pulsés (LNCMP) was created as an Unité Mixte de Recherche of the CNRS associated with the Institut National des Sciences Appliquées and the University Paul Sabatier of Toulouse. The laboratory built a 14 MJ generator and developed high strength Cu-stainless steel conductors, which allowed to get long field pulses up to 60 T.

The Januar 1st 2009, the LNCMP became the Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses of Toulouse (LNCMI-T), following its unification with the former Grenoble High Magnetic Field Laboratory (ex-GHMFL or LCMI). The LNCMI is a Unité Propre de Recherche of the CNRS laboratory (UPR 3228), associated with the Institut National des Sciences Appliquées of Toulouse, the University Paul Sabatier of Toulouse and the University Joseph Fournier of Grenoble.

Since 2012, a new generation of magnets allows the LNCMI-T to generate long-duration magnetic field pulses higher than 80 T.


More details can be found here:

State of the art and developments of high field magnets at the “Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses”, C.R. Physique 14, 2 (2013).